Anderson Knee and Shoulder Center
PRP (PLATELET RICH PLASMA), OTHER INJECTIONS AND ARTHRITIS

Over the last several years, a lot of exciting work has done in the use of concentrated platelets...
READ MORE >>


We are dedicated to providing the highest quality and scope of care to our patients. As a practice, we individualize each patient's care with the focus on finding the best solution, be it nonsurgical or surgical for each person's orthopedic problem. We develop long-term relationships with our patients and strive to provide a comfortable environment for patients to receive help with their orthopedic problems.

The Anderson Knee and Shoulder Center, located at 2100 Webster Street, Suite 309 in San Francisco, brings together two top San Francisco Orthopedic surgeons - Dr. Lesley Anderson and Dr. Robert Purchase. Both doctors aim to be among the San Francisco and Marin's best knee and shoulder surgeons, help patients choose the best nonsurgical or surgical options for knee, shoulder, and other general orthopedic surgery needs. Newest technologies/treatments for arthritis, cartilage and ligament injuries are passions as well for these two top Bay Area Specialist.




ACL Injury 101
By Matthew Panzarella, MD

Sports participation results in 70 percent of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears and the majority of these occur in 15 to 45 year olds. Approximately 70 percent of ACL injuries are noncontact injuries that occur during a sudden change in direction with a planted foot (i.e., cutting) or stopping rapidly. In the United States there are between 100,000 to 250,000 ACL ruptures annually.

The ACL is one of the main stabilizing ligaments of the knee and helps provide the hinge that allows the knee to remain stable while moving. When an ACL tear occurs the athlete often reports hearing a pop and usually cannot walk on the injured limb. During the injury it is common for the knee to partially dislocate, resulting in bruising and sometimes a small fracture at the back of the tibia and on the femur. Also common is a sprain of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) which is located on the inside of the knee. These injuries result in a painful swollen knee that is tender outside and deep within the knee

Female athletes are two to eight times more likely to rupture their ACL than male athletes. This is primarily due to mechanical reasons, such as weaker core muscles and hamstrings. Another factor that can increase the risk of ligament rupture is the interface between the player's shoes and the playing surface that results in higher friction. For example, longer cleats or more cleats on a shoe resulting in better traction and more friction. High risk sports include soccer, basketball, volleyball, skiing, and football.

Click HERE for more of our Winter 2015 Newsletter >>






Call to Schedule an Appointment
415-923-3029

2100 Webster St. #309
San Francisco, CA 94115